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SSL Insecure Notice or Warning in CCO Members Area

Currently, Nanacast (the provider for our members.cco.us content) secures the following areas with secure SSL technology:

-The main Nanacast.com login
-The Profile & Preferences page
-The Secure Checkout page
-The Update Credit card page

If you visit any of the secure pages above using Chrome, you will find a green padlock icon, indicating that page is secured with a secure HTTPS (SSL) connection.

All other pages, including the CCO Member’s area, are currently designed for normal HTTP rather than secure HTTPS so you will see the (i) Info or Not Secure warning icon in Chrome as described at https://support.google.com/chrome/answer/95617?hl=en&ref_topic=3434353. These warnings are safe to ignore.

Nanacast has plans to deploy HTTPS to its entire site, but there is currently no ETA for the transition.

Currently, Nanacast (the provider for our members.cco.us content) secures the following areas with secure SSL technology:

-The main Nanacast.com login
-The Profile & Preferences page
-The Secure Checkout page
-The Update Credit card page

If you visit any of the secure pages above using Chrome, you will find a green padlock icon, indicating that page is secured with a secure HTTPS (SSL) connection.

All other pages, including the CCO Member's area, are currently designed for normal HTTP rather than secure HTTPS so you will see the (i) Info or Not Secure warning icon in Chrome as described at https://support.google.com/chrome/answer/95617?hl=en&ref_topic=3434353. These warnings are safe to ignore.

Nanacast has plans to deploy HTTPS to its entire site, but there is currently no ETA for the transition.

Check if a site's connection is secure

To see whether a website is safe to visit, you can check for security info about the site. Chrome will alert you if you can’t visit the site safely or privately.

  1. In Chrome, open a page.
  2. To check a site's security, to the left of the web address, look at the security status:
    •  Secure
    •  Info or Not secure
    •  Not secure or Dangerous
  3. To see the site's details and permissions, select the icon. You'll see a summary of how private Chrome thinks the connection is.

What each security symbol means

These symbols let you know how safe it is to visit and use a site. They tell you if a site has a security certificate, if Chrome trusts that certificate, and if Chrome has a private connection with a site.

 Secure

Information you send or get through the site is private.

Even if you see this icon, always be careful when sharing private information. Look at the address bar to make sure you're on the site you want to visit.

Info or Not secure

The site isn't using a private connection. Someone might be able to see or change the information you send or get through this site. 

On some sites, you can visit a more secure version of the page:

  1. Select the address bar.
  2. Delete http://, and enter https:// instead.

If that doesn't work, contact the site owner to ask that they secure the site and your data with HTTPS.

 Not secure or Dangerous

We suggest you don't enter any private or personal information on this page. If possible, don't use the site.

Not secure: Proceed with caution. Something is severely wrong with the privacy of this site’s connection. Someone might be able to see the information you send or get through this site.

You might see a "Login not secure" or "Payment not secure" message.

Dangerous: Avoid this site. If you see a full-page red warning screen, the site has been flagged as unsafe by Safe Browsing. Using the site will likely put your private information at risk.

Fix "Your connection is not private" error

If you see a full-page error message saying "Your connection is not private," then there's a problem with the site, the network, or your device. Learn how to troubleshoot "Your connection is not private" errors.

What a security certificate is

When you go to a site that uses HTTPS (connection security), the website's server uses a certificate to prove the website's identity to browsers, like Chrome. Anyone can create a certificate claiming to be whatever website they want.

To help you stay on safe on the web, Chrome requires websites to use certificates from trusted organizations.

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